Sales And Marketing Recruiting Business Growing Rapidly

Here at Cube Management the demand for our recruiting services has risen rapidly over the last several months, and we expect for it to continue to grow. Why? Many of our clients have a hard time finding and retaining top sales talent. So we’re focusing on helping them through that process as an engine for growth of their companies. On the other hand we also have found that lots of top candidates are having a difficult time finding great job opportunities, and so the mission of helping people to find great work is one that’s important to us – we like helping people find great jobs.

There are lots of people out there searching for top sales and marketing jobs right now who come to us because we’re uniquely positioned as a sales and marketing recruiting firm. The reason why they come to us is because we also provide sales and marketing consulting, outsourcing and interim management, and so our recruiting services fit very nicely with the rest of our service offerings, focused on helping companies in the technology, manufacturing, health care and business service sectors.

We expect the economy to continue to stay on an even footing and move even closer towards full employment, which means that more and more companies are going to be fighting for fewer and fewer sales and marketing people who are actually looking for jobs. Candidates who are engaged in a job search are going to find it easier to entertain multiple offers, which means that they can be more selective about the kind of positions that they are looking for and how well those positions match their core skills and core interests.

Since the job market is going to stay tight like this for the next several years, what it means is that companies that are looking to recruit salespeople, marketing specialists or marketing management are going to have to do a better job of finding, locating and extracting potential employees from their competitors or from other companies. This means that they’re going to need to engage executive search firms, recruiting and staffing firms that specialize in sales and marketing to do this very job. Candidates as they become more selective are going to want to spend more time focusing on points of leverage in their search. A great point of leverage that search firms can offer is that they have multiple job opportunities under one roof, where a candidate can interview once and then be considered for a multitude of positions.

That’s exactly the situation that we have going on at Cube Management right now…we have several searches going on for senior sales representatives where we’re able to interview one candidate for multiple job opportunities and then place them accordingly.

So, the landscape has changed a lot when it comes to recruiting and staffing in sales and marketing. The economy is roaring and we don’t expect it to change anytime soon. Cube Management is strategically growing it’s sales and marketing recruiting functions in order to keep up with the demand and also fulfill this important mission.

Held Back Sales and Marketing

The best sales and marketing is less about promoting and more about holding back.

As strange as it sounds, in order to keep a customer engaged – especially early on as you strive to build a relationship and trust – the best thing to do is to not give them what they want. Instead, stimulate interaction by giving your customer some of what they ask for while delivering a complete experience in successive stages.

Your goal is to engage your customer in a number of ongoing conversations and interactions instead of just one and you do this by providing breadcrumbs for them to follow you down the path of mutual benefit. To that end, here are Don’ts and Do’s for engaging in what I call “Held Back” Sales and Marketing:

Don’ts

(1) Don’t talk about your product… unless you have no other option! Bad sales and marketing is about incessantly pitching your product. Good sales and marketing is about uncovering need and developing relationships

(2) Don’t answer every question: There are 2 problems with answering every question a customer asks. First, it gives them control of the conversation. Second, if they have all their questions answered they no longer need you. Instead, create suspense and next steps

(3) Don’t provide all information: This follows from point (2) and is also contrary to traditional sales and marketing approaches. The fact is that if you provide a customer will all the information they are looking for – especially in a complex, multi-step sale – then they often go off and make their mind up by themselves

(4) Don’t suggest solutions: Going back to point (1) we need to keep in mind to let customers “discover” the solution by themselves – your solution. Your job is to listen and lay breadcrumbs based on what they are saying. Try not to jump ahead but instead lead the way

Do’s

(1) Do engage and listen: If there is one thing that most sales and marketing professionals are not as good at as they should be, it is listening. We like to proclaim and explain whereas we should rather develop a talent for creating and managing discussions with customers

(2) Do ask questions: Remember that a person asking the questions and listening is the one in control of the conversation. Rather than give in to the temptation to lapse into sales-and-marketing-speak, use thoughtful pauses in the conversation to ask more questions

(3) Do build trust and rapport: A common misconception in sales and marketing is that your job is to talk about your company, products and services. While this certainly is the endpoint of a customer discussion, the starting point is building a relationship

(4) Do book the next step: Once you have built sufficient credibility with the customer through your professional empathy you may take on the role of guide. Your job is to engage customers on a journey, step by step, to a mutually beneficial desired outcome

Rather than trying to push customers forward, hold back and create a sales and marketing “pull” instead!

3 Keys To Efficient Sales And Marketing

“Talent wins games, but teamwork and intelligence wins championships.”

–Michael Jordon

Every business exists because it generates money. Financial performance is a relatively straight forward thing to calculate and is a result of operating performance. Operating performance, among other things, is a derivative of human performance. And one of the keys of human performance is the ability to work together efficiently.

However, there are two key business functions that have historically not worked well together: sales and marketing. If marketing and sales cannot work together, than the company’s strategy will be inconsistent and execution will be flawed.

One of the potential reasons that sales and marketing do not work well together is that management can sometimes blur the line between the two functions. Sales and marketing are very closely related, but they are different.

In many situations, sales is frequently reactive. Marketing is usually proactive. Sales reacts to the individual customer. Marketing takes the 30,000-foot view. Marketing’s role is to match the company’s capabilities with the customer wants. How often have you heard about (or experienced) a sales person who promises things to the customer that the company can’t deliver?

Producing special offerings for special customers can be done, but at what cost? Should you impose a minimum order? What other limitations should be placed on this “offering” to limit your risk? Yet, do you risk removing the value for customer by placing these limitations on this special request? Running a business based only on the wants of the customers will kill your company. In that environment, you are looking only at short-term goals. This manner of thinking will provide you with little or no substantive gain towards accomplishing the bigger company goals.

Still, you don’t want to ignore your customers either. Therefore, integrating your sales and marketing efforts is critical to your company’s success and will lead to efficiencies that pay for themselves. In today’s business landscape, sales and marketing must pull together at every level from the central concepts of the strategy to the minute details of execution.

We have taken a careful, methodical approach to researching how companies can better integrate their sales and marketing efforts. Through this process, we have discovered several methods, some more successful than others, each promising to increase motivation, efficiencies, and ultimately to enhance the bottom line. Based on our research, we believe–if an organization really wants to affect change– the following three steps are critical to successful integration:

1. Objectively assess how well sales and marketing are integrated currently. You cannot possibly know where to go if you don’t know where you are. It is important that this is done as objectively as possible, understanding that it is sometimes difficult to see the forest through the trees. If you ask the right questions and answer them as honestly as possible, you will learn a lot about the health of your organization.

2. Discover how consistently your message is being communicated. This is one of the first areas that begins to drive marketing and sales apart. The sales team is trying to close the deal anyway possible, message and rules be damned; marketing is working on crafting a specific package, regardless of the present environment. Ensuring that sales and marketing are together and “on message” should be a key area of focus if you want to integrate your teams.

3. Assess the selling process. One of the most important aspects of the selling process–and an area that is frequently neglected–is setting quantitative goals. Without the proper goals, neither sales nor marketing will be able to work towards a common objective. It will all be left to the interpretation of the individual, and that will never lead to improved teamwork. Other areas, such as pipeline management, are key to helping both sales and marketing work together.

These three areas are critical to improving your revenue. The trick, of course, is knowing the right questions to ask and then to objectively use this information to improve your situation. The benefits to this approach is that you will be making improvements to EXISTING resources. By capitalizing on your company’s intrinsic value, you can reduce costs AND increase revenue, affecting the bottom line much more quickly than extending product lines or chasing after proliferating market opportunities.